Kiiton Press
KP

Music Education 3rd week



 
Posted March 16, 2014

          
  A La Puerta del Cielo ~ Spanish-American Folk Song


Courtesy of iphyastrid
Published on Dec. 7, 2013
The Feast of Lights

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Additional source:  Click here:  A La Puerta del 
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This charming Basque lullaby consists of a melody in two verses with a gentle refrain and is built on a diatonic scale, ascending and descending by step and small skip. The harmony in the second verse derives from the melody and is well prepared. The harmony in verse 3 emerges from a straightforward two-part canon based upon verse one (with a minor adjustment to the canon in part I, bar 62). The rocking piano accompaniment enhances the sense of comfort inherent in this folksong. This piece is ideal for beginning choruses or for any two-part treble ensemble that wishes to program a short work with immediate and heartfelt appeal.


Judith Willoughby

The Basques are an ancient culture of people who have lived in the western Pyrenees Mountains, along the Bay of Biscay in modern day Spain and France for thousands of years. The Basque homeland includes the Spanish provinces of Navarra, Viscaya, Alava, and Guipuzcoa and the French provinces of Labourd, Soule, and Basse Navarre. The Basque people predate the migration of Indo-European tribes who later developed into modern Europeans. The Basque people have managed to preserve their culture despite many conquests.

The Basque people probably first migrated to the New Mexico region with Spanish explorers in the 1500s. More recently, Basque immigrants have settled throughout the American West as sheepherders. Although this lullaby was collected from Basque people in New Mexico in 1932 for the Federal Music Project of the New Deal, it is sung in Castilian Spanish, rather than the Basque language, Euskera.

1.    A la puerta del cielo vendan zapatos
Para los angelitos que andan descalzos.
Duermete, niño, Duermete, niño,
Duermete, niño, arru, arru

 
2. A los niños que duerman Dios benedice
A las madres que velan Dios las asiste.
Duermete, niño, Duermete, niño,
Duermete, niño, arru, arru

 

 

Translation:

       1.  At the gate of heaven little shoes they are selling,
For the little bare-footed angels there dwelling.
Slumber my baby, slumber my baby
Slumber my baby, arru, arru

 2.  God will bless children who go to sleep
God will help mothers who pray
Slumber my baby, slumber my baby
Slumber my baby, arru, arru

 

Melissa Roth





ANGLO-AMERICAN FOLK SONG

Oh SHENANDOAH

by Thomas Williams,  Carry Me Home: 
Folk Songs From Around the World




Tennessee Ernie Ford - Shenandoah


Courtesy of TEFSHOW

Uploaded on May 29, 2007

Buy This Classic Single on
 iTunes Today! *****

 ‪http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/shen...
    


Oh, Shenandoah

Oh, Shenandoah,

I long to see you,

Away you rolling river.

Oh Shenandoah,

I long to see you,

Away, I'm bound away,

'cross the wide Missouri.

Oh Shenandoah,

I love your daughter,

Away, you rolling river.

For her I'd cross,

Your roaming waters,

Away, I'm bound away,

'Cross the wide Missouri.

'Tis seven years,

since last I've seen you,

And hear your rolling river.

'Tis seven years,

since last I've seen you,

Away, we're bound away,

Across the wide Missouri.

Oh Shenandoah,

I long to see you,

And hear your rolling river.

Oh Shenandoah,

I long to see you,

Away, we're bound away,

Across the wide Missouri.

Taken from http://lyricstranslate.com/en/Traditional-folk-song-Oh-Shenandoah-lyrics.html#ixzz2wB8nJszu


Courtesy of Michael Soliman

Uploaded on Jun 4, 2007

O Shenandoah (arr. by J. Erb) performed by Chorus Paulinus on
 May 27, 2001
@ The Performing Arts Center in San Luis Obispo, California.


Courtesy of BVDS1

Uploaded on Feb 4, 2012

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History about Shenandoah

Source of the information below:  The Library of Congress   Song of America Project

Click here:   Shenandoah

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" Shenandoah" (traditional) ||

Perhaps one of America’s most recognizable folk tunes, the origins of "Shenandoah" are not so easily deciphered. Like many folksongs, it is impossible to determine exactly when the song was composed, yet it probably did not originate later than the Civil War. In any case, by the nineteenth century, "Shenandoah" had achieved widespread popularity, both on land and at sea.

American folklorist Alan Lomax suggested that "Shenandoah" was a sea-shanty and that the "composers" quite possibly were French-Canadian voyageurs. Sea shanties were work songs used by sailors to coordinate the efforts of completing chores such as raising the ship’s anchor or hauling ropes. The formal structure of a shanty is simple: it consists of a solo lead that alternates with a boisterous chorus. With the sweeping melodic line of its familiar refrain, "Shenandoah" is the very nature of a sea shanty; indeed, the song’s first appearance in print was in an article by William L. Alden, titled “Sailor Songs,” that was published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine (1882).

As unclear as is the song’s origin, so is the definitive interpretation of its text. Some believe that the song refers to the river of the same name. Others suggest that it is of Native American origin, for it tells the tale of Sally, the daughter of the Indian Chief Shenandoah, who is courted for seven years by a white Missouri river trader. Regardless of these textual discrepancies, "Shenandoah" remains an American classic.












CUCKOO

Also known as

Peter's Flowing Stream


     

Peter's Flowing Stream



Oh, I went to Peter’s flowing stream
Where the water’s so good
And I heard there the cuckoo
As he sang from the wood.


Chorus: Hold-di-ah....

Hold-di-ra kiki, a hol-di rah cuckoo (cuckoo) (snap fingers too)
Hold-di-ra kiki, a hol-di rah cuckoo (cuckoo)
Hold-di-ra kiki, a hol-di rah cuckoo (cuckoo)
Hold-di-ra kiki, a oh!


After Easter comes sunny days
That will melt all the snow.
Then I’ll marry my maiden fair
We’ll be happy I know.



When I marry my maiden fair
What more can I desire?
But a home for her tending
And some wood for the fire

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Peter's Flowing Stream
also known as Cuckoo



Courtesy of Tiberius Haase

Uploaded on Feb 17, 2008
Peter's Flowing Stream
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"Alouette"
French Canadian Children's Song

them, passing it"Alouette" is a popular French Canadian[1][dead link]
children's song originating in France about
plucking the feathers from a lark, in retribution for being
woken up by its song. Although it is in French, it is
well-known among speakers of other languages; in this respect it
is similar to "Frère Jacques". Many
American doughboys and other Allied soldiers learned the song
while serving in France during World War I
and brought it home with on to their children and
grandchildren.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alouette_%28song%29
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Courtesy of vintagemusictv


ALOUETTE The Delta Rhythm Boys
(Original 1958)

Uploaded on Feb 14, 2012

Follow us in: Facebook: ‪http://www.facebook.com/vintagem.es Twitter: ‪https://twitter.com/#!/VINTAGEMUSIC50 Spotify: ‪http://open.spotify.com/user/vintagem... Web: ‪http://www.vintagemusic.es Original Song of Target Commercial ‪http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMi5fF... You can download in iTunes ‪http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/vint... Another Original Song of The Delta Rhytm Boys: ‪http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xo9cMP...

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Alouette


Courtesy of Comptines et chansons

Uploaded on Feb 22, 2010

Alouette, gentille alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai. Je te plumerai la tête, Je te plumerai la tête, Et la tête, et la tête, Alouette, alouette... Aaaah ! Alouette, gentille alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai. Je te plumerai le bec, Je te plumerai le bec, Et le bec, et le bec, Et la tête, et la tête, Alouette, alouette... Aaaah ! Alouette, gentille alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai. Je te plumerai le cou, Je te plumerai le cou, Et le cou, et le cou, Et le bec, et le bec, Et la tête, et la tête, Alouette, alouette... Aaaah ! Alouette, gentille alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai. Je te plumerai le dos, Je te plumerai le dos, Et le dos, et le dos, Et le cou, et le cou, Et le bec, et le bec, Et la tête, et la tête, Alouette, alouette... Aaaah ! Alouette, gentille alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai. Je te plumerai la queue, Je te plumerai la queue, Et la queue, et la queue, Et le dos, et le dos, Et le cou, et le cou, Et le bec, et le bec, Et la tête, et la tête, Alouette, alouette... Aaaah ! Alouette, gentille alouette, Alouette, je te plumerai. Texte et partition : Comptines.TV ‪http://comptines.tv/alouette








 

Swedish Folk Song







 
 
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